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What Is Drug Addiction?

Substance dependency is a chronic illness that is identified by uncontrollable substance seeking and use, regardless of the harmful effects and alterations in the brain that can be permanent. Some people whose brain functions have been altered by drugs display some anti-social mannerisms. Addiction to drugs is a disease that can throw people into relapse too. Relapse is the reoccurrence to drug use after an endeavour to stop.


Drug dependency grows from a deliberate choice to take a substance. However, the mental strength to decide whether to use drugs or not is eroded with time. Looking for and taking the drugs gets to be distinctly compulsive. This is mainly because of the effects of long-term substance exposure on the functioning of the brain. The parts of the brain messed up by the drug dependency are the ones dealing with recompense and inspiration, knowledge and recollection, and responsible actions.

Drug dependency is an illness that alters both brain functions and actions.


Can Drug Addiction Be Treated?

There is, but it is a long journey. It is not possible for people to overcome drug addiction simply by abstaining from drug use for some days, because drug addiction is chronic. To come back to their old lives and overcome drug addiction totally, many addicts will require repeated or prolonged care periods.


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Enslavement treatment must help the individual to the accompanying

  • stop using the substances
  • abstain from drugs
  • achieve more productivity in the society in general and in the family and workplace in particular

Essentials Of Successful Treatment

These principles must be involved, if any efficient treatment program must be arrived at, as opined by several scientific researches since mid-1970s

  • Though addiction is very complicated, it could heal completely, and it affects the workings of the human brain and human behaviour.
  • There is no one treatment that will work for everyone.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available.
  • Viable treatment addresses the greater part of the patient's needs, not only his or her drug intake.
  • Going through with the programme is essential.
  • The most common forms of treatment are behaviour therapies like counselling.
  • Medications are regularly an imperative component of treatment, particularly when consolidated with behavioural therapies.
  • To make sure the user's most current requirements are met, there is a need for continuous evaluations and adjustments to the treatment regime.
  • Other possible mental disorders should be considered during treatment.
  • The first step during treatment involves detoxification that is overseen by medical personnel.
  • The treatment does not rely on the volition of the patient to yield positive fruits.
  • Drug usage amid treatment must be observed constantly.
  • The treatment programs must ensure that patients are tested for tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C, HIV/AIDS, and other infectious ailments, while they should also be informed about the best way to avoid contacting those.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

Effective treatment consists of several steps

  • medical detoxification, when the body physically rids itself of the drug
  • Behavioural advising
  • Medicine (for opioid, tobacco, or liquor enslavement)
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • long-term after treatment care to avoid relapse

A variety of care with a customised treatment programme and follow-up options can be key to being successful.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. Often, community or family based recovery groups or support systems are used as part of follow up care.


How Drug Addiction Treatment Incorporates Medications?

The treatment of co-occurring health issues, avoidance of relapse and amelioration of the withdrawal symptoms are some of the cases where medications are needed.

  • Withdrawal During the detoxification process, medication helps suppress the physical reactions. Detoxification is only an initial stage in the process; it is not a "treatment" on its own. Patients who only go through detoxification and don't have any additional treatment typically relapse back into drug use. As revealed by a study of treatment facilities, 80% of the cases of detoxification involved medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing Relapse Patients can utilize medicines to help rebuild normal brain functioning and reduce desires. Alcohol addiction, tobacco (nicotine) and opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers) have medications for their treatments. Scientists are also currently developing additional medications to treat addiction to marijuana and stimulants, like cocaine and methamphetamines. Users of multi drugs to fully recover must be treated for each one.

What About Behavioural Therapies And Drug Addiction

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to

  • Change their conducts and practices linked with drug usage
  • develop life skills that are healthy
  • continue receiving medication and other types of treatment

The settings upon which patents can access their treatments and the approaches used varies.

Outpatient behavioural treatment incorporates a wide assortment of projects for patients who visit a behavioural health counsellor on a fixed schedule. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These programmes usually provide types of behavioural therapy like

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy, which teaches patients how to recognize, avoid, and deal with any situation that will make them more likely to use drugs
  • Multidimensional family therapy in which not just the patient but also his/her family is involved able to sort out a lot of things and help the whole family cope with the changes and heal together
  • motivational interviewing, that makes the most of a person's willingness to alter their behaviour and start treatment
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.


For people with problems of high severity (plus co-occurring disorders), residential or inpatient programs will have better effects. 24-hour planned and organised care system, coupled with proper medical care and safe housing are given in residential treatment facilities that are licensed. Several approaches to therapies that are mainly designed to assist the patients to achieve a life that is free of drugs and crime after treatment are applied by residential treatment facilities.


Cases of residential treatment settings include

  • Rigidly structured programs where patients remain inpatient for 6 to 12 months are called therapeutic communities. The whole group, including treatment staff and those in recuperation, approach as key specialists of progress, affecting the patient's states of mind, comprehension and practices related with drug utilisation.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, which ordinarily concentrates on detoxification and also giving early extensive counselling and readiness for treatment in a community based setting.
  • There are also recovery housing services aimed at giving a patient a place to stay in the short term as they recuperate from treatment in other establishments. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Challenges Of Re-Entering Society

Habitual intake of drugs alters the normal functions of the brain, and various things can cause one to have a burning desire to take the drugs. For everyone in treatment, but especially for those in an inpatient program or prison, it's essential to learn how to recognize, avoid, and handle any triggers they may encounter after treatment.