The Brain And Addiction what-is-addiction

Brain Adjustments In Relation To Addictive Substances

Addictive drugs normally alter the brain over a certain period. When dependence grows, alterations in the brain make exploiters place substance above everything else.


When an addiction emerges, the brain is fundamentally reprogrammed to continue to use the drugs, regardless of the consequences. Even though physical signs of a dependence will perish, scenarios or feelings connected to previous substance misuse can bring addictions years down the line. Rehabilitation is, however, still possible. But patients should understand that treatment is a continuous process. Treatment for addiction is improving every day and has swiftly advanced over the years. Seek the assistance of others if you or your loved one is fighting the problem.


How Addictions Evolve

Every voluntary and involuntary choice we make is controlled by a complex organ in the body, the human brain. Feelings, decision-making, behaviour, basic motor skills, heart and breathing rates are all controlled by the brain. If an individual consumes an addictive drug, the limbic system discharges chemicals that make the exploiter feel great. Using too much of an addictive drugs then becomes a second nature. The highly intense, involuntary desire to utilize a drug - no matter the damage it may bring - is as a result of the real alterations that have taken place in the brain reward system. Fulfilling the addiction becomes the first priority.


Dependence on drugs is controlled by a section of the brain. The name of this section of the brain is known as the limbic system. The limbic system, also referred to as " reward system for the brain" is responsible for the pleasure emotions.



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Setting Off The Brain Reward System

The brain's reward system is triggered when a person uses an addictive drug. Dependence on drugs occur when the reward system is constantly called to action. The limbic system is automatically set off whenever we engage in pleasurable activities. Our survival and changing according to events depend on it. Every time something sparks off this system, the brain supposes something essential to survival is taking place. The brain then honours that that character by developing feeling of pleasure.


For instance, we drink water again because the reward system is switched on each time we are thirsty and quench that thirst with water. Dependent substances hijack this system, leading to emotions of joy for activities that are really dangerous. Addictive drugs, sadly, have more powerful effects on the brain reward system.


Addiction Biochemistry

One of the greatest influencers of the reward system is dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the reward system and is a naturally produced chemical in the brain. Drugs can either act like dopamine or lead to an increase in dopamine in the brain when they are introduced to the limbic system.

Because the dopamine they produce is insignificant, regular activities like food, music, sex, and drinking, do not alter the brain and cause dependence although they can switch on the reward system.

Regular levels of dopamine triggered by normal actions are 10 times lower than levels released with the use of addictive drugs.

Neuroreceptors are "bombarded" with dopamine when drugs are abused. This is what leads to the "high" that is brought on with drug use. The human brain can't create regular dopamine levels normally after prolonged and constant substance abuse. Essentially, the reward system is taken hostage by the drug.

The result is craving the substances that will bring dopamine levels back to normal. Someone in this position can no longer feel normal without the substance.


Addiction And Neurofeedback

One dependence healing process gaining traction is neurofeedback. It is as well referred to as Electroencephalogram (ECM) Biofeedback. Neurofeedback trains the brain to learn to function better. The therapy controller is supervising the brain activity while this process is being done by using sensors on the scalp. With this, the brain can improve its performance and make it better, the brain is then rewarded for doing that.

Underlying problems that might be activating addiction are targeted by neurofeedback and these problems are

  • Dejected
  • Panicking
  • Being traumatized
  • Inability to sleep

For a lot of people, neurofeedback has been a successful treatment for addition by assisting the brain figure out how to function without drugs again. Many therapy bases provide neurofeedback as a piece of a great recovery strategy. Contact us now on 0800 246 1509 to get connected to a treatment facility that can assist you.